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PEI Potatoes Remain a Cost-Effective Vegetable for Canadian Consumers

In recent weeks, there have been several news stories mentioning the highest cost of vegetables and fruits in the national media.  The softening Canadian dollar has in many cases driven up the cost of imported produce, and this is being reflected in grocery store prices.  However, one staple vegetable that has not experienced the same jump in prices is Prince Edward Island Potatoes.  That’s good news for Canadian families trying to make the most of their grocery budgets, as potatoes are also incredibly versatile.
 
"The facts are very clear, potatoes are a ‘win-win-win’ on nutrition, affordability and taste,” says Dr. Maureen Storey, President and CEO of the Alliance for Potato Research and Education.  “On nutrition, potatoes top other commonly consumed vegetables for delivering heart-healthy potassium.  And, studies from the University of Washington show that potatoes and legumes are the most affordable, potassium-rich vegetables that are well-accepted by consumers.  As far as taste goes, there’s no argument or bargaining at the dinner table when it comes to potatoes.”
 
Potatoes are packed with vitamins and minerals, particularly potassium and Vitamin C, while one medium sized potato is only 100 calories.
 
Whether someone prefers russets, whites, yellows, reds, or mini potatoes, all of these are available from Prince Edward Island potato growers at a nearby grocery store.  Consumers can look for the new Prince Edward Island Potatoes logo and packaging to ensure that they are buying potatoes grown in the rich, red soil of PEI by farmers who have been growing potatoes for generations.
 
For recipe ideas on how to use potatoes in a myriad of different ways, visit www.peipotato.com/recipes 
 
Prince Edward Island Potatoes are world renowned for the great taste and quality that comes from growing in the unique red soil of PEI.  Prince Edward Island is the largest producer of potatoes in Canada, with 225 family farms producing more than 2.5 billion pounds of potatoes in 2015.